To Republicans Boyce Adams, Phil Bryant, and Leonard Bentz and Others

Obama, and Steven Chu, his Energy Czar, are in favor of the Kemper County Coal plant and so are you.
I love coal plants with good modern scrubbers to reduce pollutants with proven technology, they do a great job. Kemper County Coal plant is experimental and is the last door Cap and Trade in the USA. The false science behind man-made Global warming should cause us to question the validity of climate changes caused by Green House Gasses and how Carbon Dioxide should be treated. We have recently seen a list of respected independent scientists come forward and speak against man-made global warming and climate change.
Does it matter what political party affiliation you have? If you are in favor of carbon dioxide containment, transporting and storage from coal plants, then you believe Al Gore’s theory that people control the climate through their pollutants, NOT THE SUN. If you support the Kemper County Coal Plant to sell and trade CO2 at a HIGH HIGH expense to ratepayers then you agree with Ted Turner that there is to many people on this earth polluting it. Listen here to what he says  He Says “we are to many people” Ted Turner is crazy! Yet our very own Southern Co, parent Co of MS Power, is fully cooperating with Ted Turner. See here for yourself. http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/news/article/2010/03/southern-company-ted-turner-acquire-first-solar-project
Why would Southern Co do that? Because there is billions to be made and they want in on it and by cooperating they have a hand in the authoring the regulations. Please notice that Texas is now closing 2-3 Lignite plants, why? Why have most CO2 capturing coal plants closed? Please ask the questions. Not because they are cost-effective and efficient but for the opposite. Kemper will never close due to over-budgeting because the stockholders are not responsible for the added expenses, the rate payers are! We are a bottomless pocket.
So what is this Kemper County CO2 capturing Lignite Coal plant really about? There is a seminar to teach you more of the perspective of the movement. http://files.meetup.com/1404856/Environmental%20Law%20Conference%2C%20Oslo%20May%209-11%202012.pdf
Do you agree that nature and the environment should have a legal status? Does this blow your mind and make your eyes pop out? There is a religion behind this movement called GAIA and it worships the environment above people. But in Genesis (Bible) it says man will have dominion over the earth not the earth over the people. Gaia worships mother earth, environment, and nature.
I am excited to see so many people waking up to this agenda to destroy America for perhaps we can stop it before it is too late.
To be 100% clear, even though I love the idea of Mississippi having a Coal plant I am against the ratepayers paying for risky experimental technology and I am against ratepayers paying for CO2 capturing because it is nothing more than a way to redistribute America’s wealth to other countries.
CO2 is NOT a poisonous gas that needs to be contained or people will die because of global warming. CO2 helps plants grow, we breathe it. Remember 6th grade science and photosynthesis? Carbon Dioxide does not cause Global Warming! Any Doubts please read Cold Sun, by John Casey like many other Mississippians. http://www.spaceandscience.net/ Casey even has a letter that describes the criminality to trading in worthless stocks.
If you are AGAINST Obama’s, Ted Turners, and the United Nation’s Cap and Trade agenda to bankrupt all coal plants, than I support you no matter the Party affiliation.

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Not Heeding the Warnings From Other Energy Companies

Why is Mississippi ignoring the warnings from other energy companies?  Others have determined that CCS fails to make economic sense at this point in time.  Is this the deal Haley Barbour made to gain  support for his now scrapped presidential run?  The residents of Mississippi will pay for this error forever because they have now paved the way for Cap and Trade to embark. There is no going back because there is
NO RISK TO MISSISSIPPI POWER COMPANY BECAUSE WE ARE PAYING FOR IT, NOT THEM!!!
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AEP Places Carbon Capture Commercialization On Hold, Citing Uncertain Status Of Climate Policy, Weak Economy

COLUMBUS, Ohio, July 14, 2011 – American Electric Power (NYSE: AEP) is terminating its cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy and placing its plans to advance carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technology to commercial scale on hold, citing the current uncertain status of U.S. climate policy and the continued weak economy as contributors to the decision.

“We are placing the project on hold until economic and policy conditions create a viable path forward,” said Michael G. Morris, AEP chairman and chief executive officer. “With the help of Alstom, the Department of Energy and other partners, we have advanced CCS technology more than any other power generator with our successful two-year project to validate the technology. But at this time it doesn’t make economic sense to continue work on the commercial-scale CCS project beyond the current engineering phase.

“We are clearly in a classic ‘which comes first?’ situation,” Morris said. “The commercialization of this technology is vital if owners of coal-fueled generation are to comply with potential future climate regulations without prematurely retiring efficient, cost-effective generating capacity. But as a regulated utility, it is impossible to gain regulatory approval to recover our share of the costs for validating and deploying the technology without federal requirements to reduce greenhouse gas emissions already in place. The uncertainty also makes it difficult to attract partners to help fund the industry’s share.”

In 2009, AEP was selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) to receive funding of up to $334 million through the Clean Coal Power Initiative to pay part of the costs for installation of a commercial-scale CCS system at AEP’s Mountaineer coal-fueled power plant in New Haven, W.Va. The system would capture at least 90 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO2) from 235 megawatts of the plant’s 1,300 megawatts of capacity. The captured CO2, approximately 1.5 million metric tons per year, would be treated and compressed, then injected into suitable geologic formations for permanent storage approximately 1.5 miles below the surface.

Plans were for the project to be completed in four phases, with the system to begin commercial operation in 2015. AEP has informed the DOE that it will complete the first phase of the project (front-end engineering and design, development of an environmental impact statement and development of a detailed Phase II and Phase III schedule) but will not move to the second phase.

DOE’s share of the cost for completion of the first phase is expected to be approximately $16 million, half the expenses that qualify under the DOE agreement.

AEP and partner Alstom began operating a smaller-scale validation of the technology in October 2009 at the Mountaineer Plant, the first fully-integrated capture and storage facility in the world. That system captured up to 90 percent of the CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas equivalent to 20 megawatts of generating capacity and injected it into suitable geologic formations for permanent storage approximately 1.5 miles below the surface. The validation project, which received no federal funds, was closed as planned in May after meeting project goals. Between October 2009 and May 2011, the life of the validation project, the CCS system operated more than 6,500 hours, captured more than 50,000 metric tons of CO2 and permanently stored more than 37,000 metric tons of CO2.

“The lessons we learned from the validation project were incorporated into the Phase I engineering for the commercial-scale project,” Morris said.

American Electric Power is one of the largest electric utilities in the United States, delivering electricity to more than 5 million customers in 11 states. AEP ranks among the nation’s largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S. AEP also owns the nation’s largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765-kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined. AEP’s transmission system directly or indirectly serves about 10 percent of the electricity demand in the Eastern Interconnection, the interconnected transmission system that covers 38 eastern and central U.S. states and eastern Canada, and approximately 11 percent of the electricity demand in ERCOT, the transmission system that covers much of Texas. AEP’s utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia and West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service Company of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas). AEP’s headquarters are in Columbus, Ohio.

This report made by American Electric Power and its Registrant Subsidiaries contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Although AEP and each of its Registrant Subsidiaries believe that their expectations are based on reasonable assumptions, any such statements may be influenced by factors that could cause actual outcomes and results to be materially different from those projected. Among the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements are: the economic climate and growth in, or contraction within, AEP’s service territory and changes in market demand and demographic patterns; inflationary or deflationary interest rate trends; volatility in the financial markets, particularly developments affecting the availability of capital on reasonable terms and developments impairing AEP’s ability to finance new capital projects and refinance existing debt at attractive rates; the availability and cost of funds to finance working capital and capital needs, particularly during periods when the time lag between incurring costs and recovery is long and the costs are material; electric load and customer growth; weather conditions, including storms, and AEP’s ability to recover significant storm restoration costs through applicable rate mechanisms; available sources and costs of, and transportation for, fuels and the creditworthiness and performance of fuel suppliers and transporters; availability of necessary generating capacity and the performance of AEP’s generating plants; AEP’s ability to recover Indiana Michigan Power’s Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant Unit 1 restoration costs through warranty, insurance and the regulatory process; AEP’s ability to recover regulatory assets and stranded costs in connection with deregulation; AEP’s ability to recover increases in fuel and other energy costs through regulated or competitive electric rates; AEP’s ability to build or acquire generating capacity, including the Turk Plant, and transmission line facilities (including the ability to obtain any necessary regulatory approvals and permits) when needed at acceptable prices and terms and to recover those costs (including the costs of projects that are cancelled) through applicable rate cases or competitive rates; new legislation, litigation and government regulation, including requirements for reduced emissions of sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, carbon, soot or particulate matter and other substances or additional regulation of fly ash and similar combustion products that could impact the continued operation and cost recovery of AEP’s plants; timing and resolution of pending and future rate cases, negotiations and other regulatory decisions (including rate or other recovery of new investments in generation, distribution and transmission service and environmental compliance); resolution of litigation (including AEP’s dispute with Bank of America); AEP’s ability to constrain operation and maintenance costs; AEP’s ability to develop and execute a strategy based on a view regarding prices of electricity, natural gas and other energy-related commodities; changes in the creditworthiness of the counterparties with whom AEP has contractual arrangements, including participants in the energy trading market; actions of rating agencies, including changes in the ratings of debt; volatility and changes in markets for electricity, natural gas, coal, nuclear fuel and other energy-related commodities; changes in utility regulation, including the implementation of electric security plans and related regulation in Ohio and the allocation of costs within regional transmission organizations, including PJM and SPP; accounting pronouncements periodically issued by accounting standard-setting bodies; the impact of volatility in the capital markets on the value of the investments held by AEP’s pension, other postretirement benefit plans and nuclear decommissioning trust and the impact on future funding requirements; prices and demand for power that AEP generates and sells at wholesale; changes in technology, particularly with respect to new, developing or alternative sources of generation; and other risks and unforeseen events, including wars, the effects of terrorism (including increased security costs), embargoes and other catastrophic events.

http://www.aep.com/newsroom/newsreleases/?id=1704

Mississippi is Waking Up Thanks to Travis Rose

Obama, Van Jones, Barbour, Bentz, & Posey

Van Jones and U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu are both on Obama’s payroll to lead the progressive movement for Economic Justice.  The chickens-have-come-home-to-roost right here in Kemper County Mississippi.

Prepare for your electric bill to increase up to 45% starting Jan 1, 2012. I think this delay is to assure successful reelections of the submissive PSCs.  Bentz, PSC South District, said the economy will rebound by 2012 and that is why he waited to raise rates.  Really?

The Kemper CAP AND TRADE project is slightly funded by Obama’s stimulus package for Green jobs.   When our Public Service Commissioners initially set financial limits to Mississippi Power’s estimate for construction,  Mississippi Power concluded the project could not proceed. ( I understand MSP has horrible credit and cannot get a loan.)

So at that junction, I understand, our PSC’s  could place the burden on families to fund the billions or Obama takes his cap and trade and shoves it to some other gullible state.  (Not Florida they rejected it)  That is where U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, with Obama’s  magic comes in.

Please see the article on Steven Chu and his vodoo-like ability change the minds of Leonard Bents and Lynn Posey to suddenly approve the most widespread economic destructive path starting with gullible Mississippi.

Future California Size Electric Bills Kept Quiet Until After the Election

Our Future California Size Electric Bills Kept Quiet Until After the Elections.  It’s politics as usual in Mississippi.

We as Mississippians are told how beneficial CO2 (carbon dioxide) contaminant, transport, and utilizing will be for Mississippi because it will be “sold” to the oil companies to inject into oil shafts.  Have we been told the whole truth?  No.  Are you offended or angered that your Public Service Commissioner failed to research and fully disclose facts for our consideration?  Who represents the people, our property values, our businesses, our future, and our communities?

Facts being withheld from the public leads many to believe they are being fed lies of omission.  There is clearly something to hide and it is not just California size off-the-chart electric bills. There is little transparency so do not allow your Public Service Commissioner to tell you they have had all these public forums to discuss the Kemper Power Plant.   We know the cost impact to the consumer has been  intentionally suppressed to reduce public scrutiny.  Perhaps our elected officials  prefer to protect the benefits they will receive for this pork-fat-filled  project.

The Politics of this is transparent.  No rate increase until after the election so you don’t know not to re-elect until it is to late.

ISS – Mississippi coal plant taken to court

ISS – Mississippi coal plant taken to court.

Mississippi coal plant taken to court

kemper_coal_plant_press_conf.jpgBy Ada McMahon, Bridge the Gulf

On Monday, Feb. 14, the Sierra Club took Mississippi Power’s proposed lignite coalmine and power plant to court, as part of its ongoing attempt to stop the project from being built.

In a morning press conference, the environmental group and a diverse range of residents and advocates voiced their opposition to the project, calling it “dirty, expensive, and unnecessary.” They said residents of south Mississippi simply cannot afford the $2.4 billion project, which is expected to bring a 48% rate increase to Mississippi Power’s residential consumers.

Rose Johnson, founder of the North Gulfport Community Land Trust and former head of the Sierra Club’s Mississippi Chapter, spoke about the impact the project would have on the African American community of North Gulfport. “My opposition arises from the numbing and debilitating effect that a 48% rate hike would have on my community and its citizens. Many are struggling to make ends meet. The last thing they need … is an unnecessary, expensive, $3 billion coal plant.”

Byron Johnson spoke to the impact such a dramatic rate hike would have on local business. “We will not be able to survive a [rate] increase,” he said of the two Gulfport restaurants he owns.

The project, slated for Kemper County, was initially rejected by Mississippi’s Public Service Commission, which cited its “unprecedented risk” and expense to ratepayers. But then the Commission reversed its decision, granting a certificate the project needs to move forward.

Sierra Club through its attorney Robert Wiygul argued that this “flip-flop” decision is arbitrary and not supported by the Commission’s own findings. They say that the Commission must justify its decision with more substantial evidence that the project is in the public interest, or stick with its earlier decision and not grant the certificate at all.

Many of Wiygul’s arguments came from the Commission’s earlier decision to reject the project. He cited the Commission’s comments that it would be “too big to fail,” and create “unprecedented risk” and “unprecedented cost” for ratepayers in Southern Mississippi.

Wiygul said that the Commission failed to explain how these, and a total of 11 risks it initially identified, were no longer of concern. 

Through his questioning, Chancery Court Judge Jim Persons appeared to have similar concerns, saying that the Commission did not address whether ratepayers will be able to afford a 48% increase in energy bills. The Judge said he will make his decision within two weeks.

Mississippi Power’s attorney Ben Stone argued that diversifying Mississippi’s energy sources with lignite coal would be cheaper for the ratepayer, pointing to the volatility of natural gas prices. But he failed to offer specifics to counter the claim that rates would rise by nearly half for Mississippi Power customers.

Passing this “unprecedented cost” off on ratepayers is enabled by a 2008 Mississippi law, which allows power companies to pay for plants before they are built through rate increases, rather than paying for upfront costs themselves or through private investors.

In addition to rate increases, which would begin in 2014, opponents have concerns about the environmental and human health impacts of lignite coal mining. The Sierra Club says the Kemper County project would displace hundreds of residents, strip mine 45 square miles, create a 500 acre dump for toxic ash, and emit mercury into streams, wetlands and neighboring communities.

No matter the environmental impacts, Sierra Club calls building any new power plant in Mississippi “unnecessary” because current plants and new energy efficiency projects can easily meet the state’s energy needs for decades to come.

(In the photo by Ada McMahon, Rose Johnson and other residents, business owners, advocates and elected officials from the Mississippi Gulf Coast speak out against the Kemper County power plant at the Harrison County Courthouse on Feb. 14, 2011.)

Phil Bryant Supports Power Rate Hike During Slow Economy

Jackson –Sept 29, 2009 at the Mississippi Public Service Commission’s public hearing on the proposed Mississippi Power Company clean coal plant, Lt. Governor Phil Bryant provided the following statement.

“I fully support the Kemper County project planned by Mississippi Power Company. This clean coal gasification plant will provide the needed electricity for Mississippi’s future economic development projects. This project is particularly important at this time when the unemployment rate in Kemper County exceeds 10 percent while during the worst recession in modern history. I hope the Mississippi Public Service Commission will quickly approve construction of the $2.2 billion plant in order to assure clean, affordable energy for generations of Mississippians.”

Phil Bryant, our economy is suffering and Mississippi cannot afford to have some of the highest electric bills in the US.  Also Mississippi businesses have expressed concerns of loosing  jobs and loosing contracts as a direct result of this hike in our power rate from the building of the new Kemper County Coal plant.

 

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